Unlocking the Cage

Unlocking the Cage

Unlocking the Cage follows animal rights lawyer Steven Wise in his unprecedented challenge to break down the legal wall that separates animals from humans. After thirty years of struggling with ineffective animal welfare laws, Steve and his legal team, the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP), are making history by filing the first lawsuits that seek to transform an animal from a thing with no rights to a person with legal protections.

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A Man Called Ove – Coming In November

a-man-called-ove-poster-2Stepping from the pages of Fredrik Backman’s international best-selling novel, Ove is the quintessential angry old man next door. An isolated retiree with strict principles and a short fuse, who spends his days enforcing block association rules that only he cares about, and visiting his wife’s grave, Ove has given up on life. Enter a boisterous young family next door who accidentally flattens Ove’s mailbox while moving in and earning his special brand of ire. Yet from this inauspicious beginning an unlikely friendship forms and we come to understand Ove’s past happiness and heartbreaks. What emerges is a heartwarming tale of unreliable first impressions and the gentle reminder that life is sweeter when it’s shared.

One of Sweden’s biggest locally-produced box office hits ever, director Hannes Holm finds the beating heart of his source material and Swedish star Rolf Lassgård, whose performance won him the Best Actor award at the 2016 Seattle International Film Festival, affectingly embodies the lovable curmudgeon Ove.

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October Is Looking Like Documentary Month

If you’ve been coming to our screenings for a while, you know we love documentaries. (Our audiences love them too!). After a run of great indie features, it looks like we will be screening two wonderful documentaries in October. We’re not quite ready to release the titles, but stay tuned. We expect to announcing our October films by 10/3.

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Hitchcock/Truffaut and Little Men next week

Next week, we kick off our fall screenings with two outstanding films: Sundance 2016 hit “Little Men” and “Hitchcock/Truffaut”, a completely unique documentary that presents a series of interviews of Hitchcock by famed French filmmaker (and serious Hitchcock fan) Francois Truffaut. We’ll run these films next weekend (Sept. 16 – 19) – showtimes to be released in a few days. Stay tuned. We hope to have some post-film discussion with speakers for Hitchcock/Truffaut.

Stay tuned.

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New Zealand “Hunt for the Wilderpeople”: Charmlingly Offbeat

Something about summer – more relaxed, more socializing…the best summer movies are usually happier and lighter.

Often, summer movies can be light on substance. But this isn’t the case with “Hunt for the Wilderpeople”. Make no mistake; it is a comedy, and you will laugh. But it’s not a site-gag film; it has substance.  Here’s how the NY Times review begins:

““Hunt for the Wilderpeople” takes a troika of familiar story types — the plucky kid, the crusty geezer, the nurturing bosom — and strips them of cliché. Charming and funny, it is a drama masquerading as a comedy about an unloved boy whom nobody wants until someone says, Yes, I’ll love him. Much of the humor comes from the child, who’s at once a pip and a gloriously expressive ambassador for the director Taika Waititi’s cleareyed take on human nature and movies. Mr. Waititi knows that we love to cry at sad and bad times, but he also knows that people in pain need to get on with their lives.”

This is director Taika Waititi’s third film, but he is increasingly a filmmaker to watch:

“Mr. Waititi’s expansive sense of human beings in “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” allows his characters to endure loss and hardship without forcing them to be wholly limited by their suffering, as marginalized people too often are in fiction … He’s still finding his way, but he’s already a director who — as he does in a shot of a friendly, undefeated child pausing to wave at a pursuer — can distill a worldview into a single, perfect cinematic moment.”

Here’s the full review from the New York Times:  

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